Links



Gallery Delaive

also visit us at: Artprice.com

or at: Artnet.com


Amsterdam

more information about Het Spiegelkwartier

current exhibitions in Amsterdam


Sam Francis

Sam Francis: samfrancis.com

Sam Francis: the website of the Sam Francis estate

Sam Francis: wikipedia encyclopedia


Karel Appel

now online the website of the Karel Appel foundation : karelappelfoundation.com

if you have any questions concerning the works of Karel Appel please contact the Karel Appel Foundation at: archive@karelappelfoundation.nl

Karel Appel: wikipedia encyclopedia


Niki de Saint Phalle

Niki de Saint Phalle:the Niki Charitable Art Foundation

Niki de Saint Phalle: Tarot gardenofficial website

Niki de Saint Phalle: Queen Califia's Magical Circle Garden


Walasse Ting

Walasse Ting:丁雄泉 - Chinese version


Ayako Rokkaku

Ayako Rokkaku: www.rokkakuayako.com

Ayako Rokkaku: www.ayakorokkaku.com


Kees van Bohemen

Kees van Bohemen: www.keesvanbohemen.nl


other

more information about graphic art: What is a print?

The Saatchi Gallery: The Saatchi Gallery - Contemporary art in London 


videos

 

Sam Francis

Audio: Sam Francis, Violet, Yellow and White





Sam Francis and Walasse Ting about Andy Warhol

Sam Francis / Walasse Ting

talking about Andy Warhol





The painter, Sam Francis

Sam Francis, the painter

trailer of the film by Jeffrey Perkins





See Walasse Ting painting

Walasse Ting

painting in the studio of Sam Francis, Venice, CA





See Karel Appel painting

Karel Appel

the great Cobra painter in action, 1962





See Ayako Rokkaku painting

Ayako Rokkaku

painting in Amsterdam in the studio of Gallery Delaive, 2007





See Ayako Rokkaku painting

Ayako Rokkaku

painting at Geisai 10





KaiKai & KiKi animation

Takashi Murakami

KaiKai & Kiki Animation




Geisai museum

Geisai museum

Takashi Murakami - Ayako Rokkaku





Niki de Saint Phalle exhibition in the Tate

Niki de Saint Phalle

exhibition at the Tate, Liverpool





Performance by Yves Klein

Yves Klein

Anthropometries of the blue period, 1960





See Picasso painting

Pablo Picasso

Visit to Picasso





See Picasso painting

Kees van Dongen

opening of Kees van Dongen exhibition in Museum Boijmans Van Beuningen, Rotterdam, 1967



Artdaily

Ryerson Image Centre acquires pioneering photographer Berenice Abbott's archive

In conjunction with International Women’s Day, the Ryerson Image Centre celebrates the landmark acquisition of the Berenice Abbott Archive. Abbott, the pioneering artist best known for her extensive and iconic documentation of New York City, is among the most important photographers of the 20th century. Donated by a generous circle of benefactors who wish to remain anonymous, the Abbott Archive includes photographs, original negatives, and working materials representing the entire arc of her six-decade career. It joins and greatly enriches the RIC’s holdings, which already include the Black Star Collection of photo-reportage and other individual artist’s archives, along with photography surveying the history of the medium. The largest and most comprehensive collection anywhere of the artist’s work, the Abbott Archive is comprised of more than

National Gallery opens UK's first major exhibition devoted to the man who invented Impressionism

This spring, the National Gallery presents the UK’s first major exhibition devoted to the man who invented Impressionism, Paul Durand-Ruel (1831-1922). An entrepreneurial art dealer, Durand-Ruel discovered and unwaveringly supported the Impressionist painters and is now considered a founding father of the international art market as we know it today. Inventing Impressionism includes around 85 works, among them a number of Impressionism’s greatest masterpieces which have never been seen in the UK before. These pictures - the vast majority of which were dealt by Durand-Ruel - are borrowed from the key European and American collections he helped form, as well as from Japan. This ground-breaking exhibition lifts the veil on the pivotal figure that discovered Monet, Pissarro, Degas and Renoir in the early 1870s,

French tomb, crammed with Greek and possibly Etruscan artefacts, sheds light on Iron Age European trade

A tomb from the fifth century BC, likely that of a Celtic prince, has been unearthed in a small French town, shedding light on Iron Age European trade, researchers said Wednesday. The "exceptional" grave, crammed with Greek and possibly Etruscan artefacts, was discovered in a business zone on the outskirts of Lavau in France's Champagne region, said the National Archaeological Research Institute, Inrap. A team from the institute has been excavating the site since October last year, and have dated it to the end of the First Iron Age -- a period characterised by the widespread use of the metal. The burial mound, 40 metres (130 feet) across, has at its heart a 14-square-metre (150-square-foot) burial chamber, not yet opened, of an ancient VIP. "It is probably a local Celtic

Pinakothek in Munich draws works of art from its collection for new exhibition

In addition to the great masterpieces of art held by the Pinakothek galleries, they also hold in storage a wide range of pictorial representations of topics and horizons of experience that elude the traditional lines of development in art. Stored away as they are, these pictures are often only accessible to the daily work or individual interests of the curators and thus remain invisible within the canon of masterpieces. „Curator’s choice“ is an invitation to pursue these themes, experiences and issues subjectively and to create associations – by drawing on the collection itself and also beyond it – in hall 20 of the Neue Pinakothek from March 4 until June 1 of this year. 19th century art witnessed a dramatic loss of depicted angels, which had hitherto been so popular ever since the Middle Ages. Whether heavenly messengers, celestial gate-keepers or guardian angels – the Enlightenment

France's Monte-Cristo castle in need of repair; $1 million needed to get it back in shape

Nearly one million euros is needed to restore the Monte-Cristo castle that was once home to famed novelist Alexandre Dumas, author of classics including "The Three Musketeers". The castle in northern France has fallen into disrepair and is threatened by humidity. The current managers of the estate say 921,000 euros ($1.0 million) is needed to get it back in shape. The municipal association that runs the estate is looking for public contributions to help with the restoration. If they can raise five percent of the funds, they will get further help from the national Heritage Foundation. So far fundraising efforts have been disappointing, with only 150 euros collected in two weeks. Having made a fortune from his literary successes, Dumas had the castle built in Port-Marly in 1844 and named it after one of his most popular novels, "The Count