Gallery Delaive

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more information about Het Spiegelkwartier

current exhibitions in Amsterdam

Sam Francis

Sam Francis:

Sam Francis: the website of the Sam Francis estate

Sam Francis: wikipedia encyclopedia

Karel Appel

now online the website of the Karel Appel foundation :

if you have any questions concerning the works of Karel Appel please contact the Karel Appel Foundation at:

Karel Appel: wikipedia encyclopedia

Niki de Saint Phalle

Niki de Saint Phalle:the Niki Charitable Art Foundation

Niki de Saint Phalle: Tarot gardenofficial website

Niki de Saint Phalle: Queen Califia's Magical Circle Garden

Walasse Ting

Walasse Ting:丁雄泉 - Chinese version

Ayako Rokkaku

Ayako Rokkaku:

Ayako Rokkaku:

Kees van Bohemen

Kees van Bohemen:


more information about graphic art: What is a print?

The Saatchi Gallery: The Saatchi Gallery - Contemporary art in London 




Sam Francis

Audio: Sam Francis, Violet, Yellow and White

Sam Francis and Walasse Ting about Andy Warhol

Sam Francis / Walasse Ting

talking about Andy Warhol

The painter, Sam Francis

Sam Francis, the painter

trailer of the film by Jeffrey Perkins

See Walasse Ting painting

Walasse Ting

painting in the studio of Sam Francis, Venice, CA

See Karel Appel painting

Karel Appel

the great Cobra painter in action, 1962

See Ayako Rokkaku painting

Ayako Rokkaku

painting in Amsterdam in the studio of Gallery Delaive, 2007

See Ayako Rokkaku painting

Ayako Rokkaku

painting at Geisai 10

KaiKai & KiKi animation

Takashi Murakami

KaiKai & Kiki Animation

Geisai museum

Geisai museum

Takashi Murakami - Ayako Rokkaku

Niki de Saint Phalle exhibition in the Tate

Niki de Saint Phalle

exhibition at the Tate, Liverpool

Performance by Yves Klein

Yves Klein

Anthropometries of the blue period, 1960

See Picasso painting

Pablo Picasso

Visit to Picasso

See Picasso painting

Kees van Dongen

opening of Kees van Dongen exhibition in Museum Boijmans Van Beuningen, Rotterdam, 1967


Flemish 'Mystic Lamb' masterpiece restored after chaotic past

A painstaking restoration of a 15th-century Flemish masterpiece is revealing the long-lost detail and splendour that helped make the altarpiece one of the world's most stolen artworks. "The Adoration of the Mystic Lamb" by the Van Eyck brothers was unveiled 600 years ago at Saint Bavo's Cathedral in Ghent, but since then its full glory has dimmed, after being split into pieces, seized by Napoleon, then the Nazis, and nabbed by thieves. "You could say it is like the rediscovery of Michelangelo's Sistine Chapel after its restoration," Marie Postec of Belgium's Royal Institute for Cultural Heritage told AFP. "The original was hidden by layers of dirt and alterations, the colours had completely faded. Today, the same thing is happening here, and we have the chance to witness its rebirth," Postec said. The giant altarpiece, which measures 4.4 metres by 3.4 metres (15 feet by 10 feet), is attributed to Hubert Van Eyck and his better-known brother Jan, and was completed in 1432 when Ghent in

Did T-rex wake up to birdsong?

Tyrannosaurus-rex and other dinosaurs woke up to birdsong just like we do, though it was probably more honk than melodic chirping, an extraordinary fossil find revealed Wednesday. The discovery in Antarctica of the oldest known avian voice box -- called a syrinx -- proved that birds crisscrossed Late Cretaceous skies some 68 million years ago, during the final act of the age of dinosaurs, a study said. Until now, the oldest known specimen of a syrinx -- made from cartilage quick to decompose -- dated from a mere 2.5 million years ago. The new fossil belonged to a species known as Vegavis iaai and "shows an asymmetry seen in living ducks," said Julia Clarke, an associate professor at the University of Texas in Austin, and lead author of the study published in Nature. The structure of the syrinx suggested "the capacity to produce calls like honks or whistles," she told AFP. V. iaai was already famous among

Pierre-Auguste Renoir retrospective opens in Spain

Writing about his father, the filmmaker Jean Renoir said: “He looked at flowers, women and clouds in the sky as other men touch and caress.” Renoir: Intimacy, the first retrospective in Spain to focus on the Impressionist painter Pierre-Auguste Renoir (1841-1919), challenges the traditional concept that reduces Impressionism to the “purely visual”. Rather, it emphasises the central role played by tactile sensations in Renoir’s paintings, which are present in all the different phases of his career and are expressed through a wide range of genres including group scenes, portraits, nudes, still lifes and landscapes. Curated by Guillermo Solana, Artistic Director of the Museo Thyssen-Bornemisza, the exhibition is sponsored by Japan Tobacco International (JTI) and presents a survey of 78 works by the artist loaned from museums and collections worldwide, including the Musée Marmottan Monet in

Swiss billionaire fined $4 mn over undeclared artwork: reports

Swiss customs authorities have slapped a billionaire with a $4 million fine for failing to properly declare some 200 artworks imported into Switzerland, according to media reports confirmed by officials Sunday. Financier Urs Schwarzenbach has for years been bringing precious artworks by the likes of Yves Klein and Giovanno Segantini into Switzerland without declaring them to customs officials, or reporting their worth at far below their actual value, several Swiss media outlets reported. Suspecting the billionaire of importing artwork illegally, Swiss customs authorities opened an investigation in 2012. The probe concluded earlier this month that he had effectively dodged duties worth 10 million Swiss francs ($10 million, 9.2 million euros), which he was ordered to repay, along with a four million franc fine, the NZZ am Sonntag, Sonntagszeitung and Le Matin

Laos' Plain of Jars recreated in virtual reality

Australian archaeologists announced plans Wednesday to recreate Laos' mysterious Plain of Jars as a three-dimensional virtual reality experience, that could one day see museum visitors walk through remote dig sites. The Plain of Jars, in Laos' central Xieng Khouang province, is scattered with thousands of stone vessels but scientists have yet to discover their original purpose. Archaeologists have struggled to access the jar sites, many of which have yet to be cleared of unexploded mines and bombs dropped on the country during the Vietnam War. But Australian researchers now say that their use of drones which capture 3D images every 10 centimetres (3.9 inches) would allow them to explore sites like these that cannot be assessed in traditional ways. "The potential especially for places like Laos where there's a serious UXO (Unexploded Ordnance) problem is that using remote technology to explore and map archaeological sites is incredibly useful," Dougald O'Reilly from the Australian Natio